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[SOLVED] UPDATE page 2 post 5:Linux Mint 17.3 Live DVD Error: Possible Hardware Issue

TheWendyPowerTheWendyPower Posts: 14
edited March 2016 in Installation

You can find my system specs HERE

Using compatibility mode, I still can't get the live DVD for Xfce 17.3 64 bit to boot completely. I get further with compatibility mode but still no dice. The last readable thing on the screen is:

CPUFreq Utilities: Setting ondemand CPUFreq governor...

Then it is all scrambled and running very fast. I have video of it, but the file is very large. HERE are images that go with the before, after and how my ASUS UEFI Firmware (version 501) is set at default. After researching and some help from a member, I think it is an issue with my hardware. I checked MD5 before creating the live DVD and was successful at putting this on the laptop, which has older hardware. However, I'm very new to all of this. My goal is to ditch Windows all together.

When trying to boot live DVD with following UEFI settings, there is a quick flash of code (that can't be read) then there is no output to my monitors.

Fastboot: Disabled
CSM: Auto
Secure Boot: Enabled
OS Type Windows UEFI mode


Scrambled Code 01 goes with Before and After images 01 in the linked Google Drive folder above.

Fastboot: Disabled
CSM: Enabled
Boot Device Control: UEFI and Legacy OPROM
Secure Boot: Enabled
OS Type: Windows UEFI mode


Scrambled Code 02 goes with Before and After images in the linked Google Drive folder above.

Fastboot: Disabled
CSM: Enabled
Boot Device Control: Legacy Only
Secure Boot: Enabled
OS Type: Other OS


On all I have not disabled secure boot, as it is not an option in my UEFI. I can however delete the secure boot keys (the last two images in the folder).

Comments

  • xgraystorm01xgraystorm01 Posts: 12
    edited February 2016
    You should be able to disable secure boot, but that wouldn't surprise me if you can't as Windows in pushing their windows 10 BS agenda. Definitely try adding nomodeset to your boot parameters for the DVD.

    Since you have an nvidia card, usually, they have a thing called optimus, which basically uses the onboard intel and the nvidia together to provide graphics. (Intel when there is nothing graphic intensive, then switching to the nvidia when it is graphics intensive) I've read that there can be issues with the official drivers for the "switching', and that it requires some tweaking to be able to run an optimus enabled card

    DO NOT DELETE THE SECURE KEYS, or you might not be able to use windows.
  • I'm kicking myself for getting the PC that shipped with Windows 10. I do have an option to reinstall default keys, but I'm VERY hesitant to delete them. I have no intention of duel booting once I have a Linux OS on this machine. It is the main one I work from, so I need it to boot into an OS, even if I loath the OS. I should have a minuet to try adding nomodset this afternoon.
    You should be able to disable secure boot, but that wouldn't surprise me if you can't as Windows in pushing their windows 10 BS agenda. Definitely try adding nomodeset to your boot parameters for the DVD.

    Since you have an nvidia card, usually, they have a thing called optimus, which basically uses the onboard intel and the nvidia together to provide graphics. (Intel when there is nothing graphic intensive, then switching to the nvidia when it is graphics intensive) I've read that there can be issues with the official drivers for the "switching', and that it requires some tweaking to be able to run an optimus enabled card

    DO NOT DELETE THE SECURE KEYS, or you might not be able to use windows.
  • TheWendyPowerTheWendyPower Posts: 14
    edited February 2016
    So you can only edit the code after installation. I tried all kinds of settings in my UEFI. I noticed setting it to Other OS in Secure Boot unmounts the security keys. I was able to get Chromixium to boot on the desktop (running the graphics compatibility option). It did have a code spasm as well, but it eventually loaded the GUI. Settings I used in UEFI:
    Fastboot: Disabled
    CSM: Auto (that is default)
    Security Boot: Enabled
    OS Type: Other OS
    
  • So you can only edit the code after installation. I tried all kinds of settings in my UEFI. I noticed setting it to Other OS in Secure Boot unmounts the security keys. I was able to get Chromixium to boot on the desktop (running the graphics compatibility option). It did have a code spasm as well, but it eventually loaded the GUI. Settings I used in UEFI:
    Fastboot: Disabled
    CSM: Auto (that is default)
    Security Boot: Enabled
    OS Type: Other OS
    

    This is my conclusion, why not buy hardware that was made to be compatible with linux? There are several PC manufacturing companies that design PC hardware that works great with linux System76. You can even build your own, provided you use a motherboard that still uses the legacy bios boot system.

    MS is not going to make it easy to install a non-windows OS on hardware pre-installed with their OS. UEFI is used to protect their OS, not really for the well being of other OSes. Sadly, most of the PCs we see displayed at public retail stores have windows installed on it. The hardware looks and performs well, but you are limited to using windows. It might be best to stay away from hardware pre-installed with windows if you are planning on making GNU/Linux your primary OS.
  • Because when I bought this system the end of December,I wasn't looking for a system that would run Linux. I was looking for something with decent specs that would be good for me to work at home from. However, Windows 10 has been a nightmare for working. Seems like most of the time when I sit down to work I have to mess with some horrible Windows update and not getting work done. I can't buy or build a computer at this time, my funds are maxed to tech purchase.

    What are my options for distros that are light and have a newer kernel? There are times when I have a bunch of tabs open, on a browser (and on two screens). I like Chromixiium, but don't want it on my desktop. I can also get the live DVD for Ubuntu 14.04.4 to load. Though some funky things happen when trying to shut down the live DVD. Since I've only been researching and learning about this for a week, I don't know if that is normal or not.

    I WISH I had been looking for a PC with Linux in mind, but I can't change that now. In the future, it will defiantly be in my considerations.
    So you can only edit the code after installation. I tried all kinds of settings in my UEFI. I noticed setting it to Other OS in Secure Boot unmounts the security keys. I was able to get Chromixium to boot on the desktop (running the graphics compatibility option). It did have a code spasm as well, but it eventually loaded the GUI. Settings I used in UEFI:
    Fastboot: Disabled
    CSM: Auto (that is default)
    Security Boot: Enabled
    OS Type: Other OS
    

    This is my conclusion, why not buy hardware that was made to be compatible with linux? There are several PC manufacturing companies that design PC hardware that works great with linux System76. You can even build your own, provided you use a motherboard that still uses the legacy bios boot system.

    MS is not going to make it easy to install a non-windows OS on hardware pre-installed with their OS. UEFI is used to protect their OS, not really for the well being of other OSes. Sadly, most of the PCs we see displayed at public retail stores have windows installed on it. The hardware looks and performs well, but you are limited to using windows. It might be best to stay away from hardware pre-installed with windows if you are planning on making GNU/Linux your primary OS.
  • Dell has also started selling laptops with ubuntu pre-installed.

    Just wondering WP, have you tried any other linux distros besides Mint? Ubuntu 12.04 and up have UEFI enablled booting, with a key that is signed by microsoft.

    this article:
    http://www.howtogeek.com/175641/how-to-boot-and-install-linux-on-a-uefi-pc-with-secure-boot/

    talks about secure boot and that with some distros they have their own "key" that you can add to UEFI BIOS.
  • So you can only edit the code after installation. I tried all kinds of settings in my UEFI. I noticed setting it to Other OS in Secure Boot unmounts the security keys. I was able to get Chromixium to boot on the desktop (running the graphics compatibility option). It did have a code spasm as well, but it eventually loaded the GUI. Settings I used in UEFI:
    Fastboot: Disabled
    CSM: Auto (that is default)
    Security Boot: Enabled
    OS Type: Other OS
    

    The link supplied in the last post of this threat is an article that states, secure boot must be disabled if you want to install a Linux OS that does not have a UEFI key signed to It. You will have to enable secure boot to get windows to boot though. Latest versions of Ubuntu would work best. Not sure of Mint. You mention you were unable to disable secure boot. As the article said, secure boot cannot be disabled if you are using an ARM system with Windows NT installed. If you are sure you are not, search for the manufacture's documentation of your system and see if there is a section to disable secure boot.
  • You can find my system specs HERE

    Using compatibility mode, I still can't get the live DVD for Xfce 17.3 64 bit to boot completely. I get further with compatibility mode but still no dice. The last readable thing on the screen is:
    CPUFreq Utilities: Setting ondemand CPUFreq governor...
    
    Then it is all scrambled and running very fast. I have video of it, but the file is very large. HERE are images that go with the before, after and how my ASUS UEFI Firmware (version 501) is set at default. After researching and some help from a member, I think it is an issue with my hardware. I checked MD5 before creating the live DVD and was successful at putting this on the laptop, which has older hardware. However, I'm very new to all of this. My goal is to ditch Windows all together.

    When trying to boot live DVD with following UEFI settings, there is a quick flash of code (that can't be read) then there is no output to my monitors.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Auto
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type Windows UEFI mode
    

    Scrambled Code 01 goes with Before and After images 01 in the linked Google Drive folder above.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Enabled 
         Boot Device Control: UEFI and Legacy OPROM
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type: Windows UEFI mode
    

    Scrambled Code 02 goes with Before and After images in the linked Google Drive folder above.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Enabled 
         Boot Device Control: Legacy Only
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type: Other OS
    

    On all I have not disabled secure boot, as it is not an option in my UEFI. I can however delete the secure boot keys (the last two images in the folder).

    I just looked at your specs and noticed that you do not have an ARM machine. Think God. However, you are still unable to boot. Well, as long as you have secure boot enabled, no linux system without a signed MS key will boot. Remember, secure boot keeps non-microsoft windows from booting and non-MS software from installing at the boot level. You are installing a non-microsoft software.

    I have noticed you still have CSM enabled. Have you tried disabling it then try to disable secure boot? Perhaps they both work hand-to-hand

    You should have a read of these too articles,

    http://www.howtogeek.com/116637/htg-explains-what-is-windows-rt-what-does-it-mean-to-me/

    http://www.howtogeek.com/116569/htg-explains-how-windows-8s-secure-boot-feature-works-what-it-means-for-linux/

    Microsoft will soon start taking away the ability to disable secure boot in laptops and desktops that do not have an ARM device in it sometime in the near future. Beware, what I read will scare you.
  • Thanks. I was having other issues with the system, and since it is under warranty I have sent it in to ASUS (should arrive there tomorrow). I was getting the same error on all the distros I've tried, even the ones that have compatible keys. I'm wondering if the issues I was having with the system are the reason for not being able to install a Linus OS. Well, I'm hopping. It gives me more time for reading and research before it gets there.

    I have an i7-3770s from an all-in-one that dies in Dec. I think I might use it in slowly building my own system, where I don't have to worry about Windows crap anymore. Thank you all for your help. It means alot!
    You can find my system specs HERE

    Using compatibility mode, I still can't get the live DVD for Xfce 17.3 64 bit to boot completely. I get further with compatibility mode but still no dice. The last readable thing on the screen is:
    CPUFreq Utilities: Setting ondemand CPUFreq governor...
    
    Then it is all scrambled and running very fast. I have video of it, but the file is very large. HERE are images that go with the before, after and how my ASUS UEFI Firmware (version 501) is set at default. After researching and some help from a member, I think it is an issue with my hardware. I checked MD5 before creating the live DVD and was successful at putting this on the laptop, which has older hardware. However, I'm very new to all of this. My goal is to ditch Windows all together.

    When trying to boot live DVD with following UEFI settings, there is a quick flash of code (that can't be read) then there is no output to my monitors.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Auto
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type Windows UEFI mode
    

    Scrambled Code 01 goes with Before and After images 01 in the linked Google Drive folder above.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Enabled 
         Boot Device Control: UEFI and Legacy OPROM
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type: Windows UEFI mode
    

    Scrambled Code 02 goes with Before and After images in the linked Google Drive folder above.
    Fastboot: Disabled 
    CSM: Enabled 
         Boot Device Control: Legacy Only
    Secure Boot: Enabled
         OS Type: Other OS
    

    On all I have not disabled secure boot, as it is not an option in my UEFI. I can however delete the secure boot keys (the last two images in the folder).

    I just looked at your specs and noticed that you do not have an ARM machine. Think God. However, you are still unable to boot. Well, as long as you have secure boot enabled, no linux system without a signed MS key will boot. Remember, secure boot keeps non-microsoft windows from booting and non-MS software from installing at the boot level. You are installing a non-microsoft software.

    I have noticed you still have CSM enabled. Have you tried disabling it then try to disable secure boot? Perhaps they both work hand-to-hand

    You should have a read of these too articles,

    http://www.howtogeek.com/116637/htg-explains-what-is-windows-rt-what-does-it-mean-to-me/

    http://www.howtogeek.com/116569/htg-explains-how-windows-8s-secure-boot-feature-works-what-it-means-for-linux/

    Microsoft will soon start taking away the ability to disable secure boot in laptops and desktops that do not have an ARM device in it sometime in the near future. Beware, what I read will scare you.
  • UPDATE:

    So I ended up getting really frustrated because the constant stream of errors when trying to boot from CD on my desktop. I was sure there were some issues with the motherboard, and I sent it to ASUS for a warranty repair. I shipped it off on Feb 23rd and I got it back March 12th.

    While it was gone, I did more research on the error I was getting and the set up of my motherboard UEFI. When my desktop arrived on Saturday, I tried again and was still frustrated with errors. My graphics card definitely begin my problem.

    1) I changed settings in my UEFI so it would only use the integrated graphics and not my graphics card. Additionally, I made sure I was only hooked up to one of my monitors (using VGA not HDMI) directly off the motherboard.

    2) I had to delete my secure boot keys, so I could turn off secure boot. My UEFI allows for reinstallation of the stock keys, but I backed them up on a USB first just to be safe.

    Once I got Korora 23 installed (only OS, not dual booting) and updated, I was able to get the drivers for my NVIDIA GeForce GT730 installed through YUM. Then I went back to my UEFI and set it back to using my graphics card, hooked up my dual monitors to it. My main system has been running happy on Linux since yesterday afternoon. I have achieved my goal of being a Windows free home :-)

    Currently both the desktop and laptop are running the same OS. The laptop is only stable (aka not having random freezing) on the 4.4.4 kernel. However, I'll defiantly be trying out different distros and desktops.

    Thank you all for being nice to the newbie while I worked through my tech issues!
  • saqman2060saqman2060 Posts: 777
    Glad you were able to resolve your issue. UEFI has been a complex shift on secure computing. Linux fans, like you and I have to do a little excavating to get something done. Not as it was easy before UEFI, it just adds another layer of hills to jump over. Good thing to kept the MS secure boot keys. If you ever want to install windows again in secure boot you will need them. Contact us if you every have any other issues concerning your system.
  • Thanks! It felt very satisfying to finally successfully boot a Linux OS on my main machine. It is even more satisfying that my system is easy on the resources so I have more power to devote to work. I'm definitely hooked!
    Glad you were able to resolve your issue. UEFI has been a complex shift on secure computing. Linux fans, like you and I have to do a little excavating to get something done. Not as it was easy before UEFI, it just adds another layer of hills to jump over. Good thing to kept the MS secure boot keys. If you ever want to install windows again in secure boot you will need them. Contact us if you every have any other issues concerning your system.
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