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Startup question?

Very simple question...how do I change the startup in Lubuntu? I am using 10.04.

"Sweep The Leg!"

Comments

  • saqman2060saqman2060 Posts: 777
    Are you asking how lubuntu boots up?
  • asedtasedt Posts: 96
    You have to be more specific than "startup", what is it that you really want to accomplish?

    There is a lot of things going on on "startup".
  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    If you want to run some application when the computer starts up, then you can edit the /etc/rc.local script which is run by the OS after all the other drivers and servers are started. It is basically the Linux version of autoexec.bat.
  • sorry for the late response, what I meant to say, I wanted to find out how to make a program or script accessible anywhere from the o/s. I figured it out. I created a symbolic link to from program directory to /bin, then chmod +x. I was taking a intro to programming class taught in processing. After extracting the file, I was tired of navigating to the files directory just to run it. Funny thing now is I am using Puppy Linux, like it much better.
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    rabidvillain wrote:
    sorry for the late response, what I meant to say, I wanted to find out how to make a program or script accessible anywhere from the o/s. I figured it out. I created a symbolic link to from program directory to /bin, then chmod +x. I was taking a intro to programming class taught in processing. After extracting the file, I was tired of navigating to the files directory just to run it. Funny thing now is I am using Puppy Linux, like it much better.[/quote

    To accomplish the same task with custom scripts and applications I have added an additional entry to my PATH variable that points to my scripts directory, then placed that entry into my .bashtrc file so it is only available to the single user.

    So, to have a direct references to ~/scripts I added "export PATH=$PATH:~/scripts" into ~/.bashrc
  • jabiralijabirali Posts: 157
    mfillpot wrote:
    To accomplish the same task with custom scripts and applications I have added an additional entry to my PATH variable that points to my scripts directory, then placed that entry into my .bashrc file so it is only available to the single user
    This is what I've done as well, and it's a lot easier to maintain between reinstalls since you don't wipe out /home without backups that often... Personally, I also keep my script folder in Dropbox, so that the scripts are automatically distributed to all my Linux computers.

    By the way, if you insist on symlinking your scripts into the system path, the conventional place is /usr/local/bin/ :)
  • marcmarc Posts: 647
    jabirali wrote:
    mfillpot wrote:
    To accomplish the same task with custom scripts and applications I have added an additional entry to my PATH variable that points to my scripts directory, then placed that entry into my .bashrc file so it is only available to the single user
    This is what I've done as well, and it's a lot easier to maintain between reinstalls since you don't wipe out /home without backups that often... Personally, I also keep my script folder in Dropbox, so that the scripts are automatically distributed to all my Linux computers.

    By the way, if you insist on symlinking your scripts into the system path, the conventional place is /usr/local/bin/ :)

    I rather sync the script folder to all the computer I work on (I find dropbox to be worse than a binary driver)
  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    What mfillpot said. Create a bin directory in your home ( "mkdir ~/bin" ) and put your scripts and applications there. Placing them in /bin, or even a link to them in /bin is VERY unsafe, and can compromise your system. You have to make them available to other users, then normally the scripts/application executables/libraries are installed into /usr/local/(bin | lib).
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