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setting a server

Hi, I have a standard home use DSL router with wireless capabilities. I also have cousins and a brother that like to connect to my WIFI with their Ipod Touches. Do guys know of some way I can get request for Internet on my wireless ( and my LAN for that matter ) to go through a server before going to the router? I am taking networking classes in college but I still don't know how to set something like that up. Basically I want so use the server as DNS and some service that will act as parental blocking software. I want all the request their Ipod Touches make for the Internet to go through the sever before the router so I can control what they access online because they like bootlegging movies and porn and stuff and I don't want that type of activity on my network. I'm not letting them use my WIFI again in till I figure out how to do this. Of course I want the server to be Linux so keep that in mind when answering my post, I need to know how to physically set up the topology and Also what I have to do to configure the server. Even reference material will be useful. Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    What you are talking about is setting up your router to redirect the web traffic to a network based proxy server.

    There is an index of Linux based proxy server software at http://www.linux.org/apps/all/Daemons/Proxy.html, I generally use squid because that is what I learned on, there is a configuration guide at http://www.brennan.id.au/11-Squid_Web_Proxy.html.
  • Thanks mfillpot your pretty smart at this stuff
  • Yep mfillpot your idea worked. It worked for a while but motherboard got fried ( I think it was a malfunction in the power cable or the power supply box because I heard crackling when I wiggled the power cable. ) after I heard a loud zap sound. Its ok though the computer was like 10 years old or something ( I know I bought it the first year XP was released ) Linux definetly prolonged its useable life.
  • I would look into using pfSense. Its a freeBSD router/server all-in-one enterprise grade OS. Its all configurable through the web-gui. The only thing I have found I don't like so far is that your can't edit the rules through iptalbes or any of the usual config files - only a single xml file. The nice thing is its less than a 1gb in size, very fast, very light, and has a lot of really good add-ons. This includes a squid-proxy server. Is this your first router/server? If it is - I recommend pfsense.
  • gomergomer Posts: 158
    Now that the "server" is dead .... What kind of router do you have? Have you considered installing Linux on the router itself? *wink*

    See if you can run Tomoato, or DDWRT, or OpenWRT or Angstrom on it .... You may be able to get the same functionality you wanted with one less piece of hardware ....
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    gomer wrote:
    Now that the "server" is dead .... What kind of router do you have? Have you considered installing Linux on the router itself? *wink*

    See if you can run Tomoato, or DDWRT, or OpenWRT or Angstrom on it .... You may be able to get the same functionality you wanted with one less piece of hardware ....

    Good Recommendation, with the right router running dd-wrt you can get some realy nice functionality with minimum configuration.
  • Its just a little residential 4 Port Gateway router, I don't think Linux can be installed on it.

    Westell
    model 7500
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    I am not seeing that one even listed on the dd-wrt website, http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/support/router-database
  • gomergomer Posts: 158
    I only ever see the Westells when they are provided by the ISP (usually Verizon). Generally, the ISPs don't appreciate us voiding the warranties on their rented equipment.

    However, I just bought an Asus WL-5200U on ebay for $40 w/ shipping. I've seen those go for as little as $25. You *could* find a nice low cost router w/ ample flash, or with a SD / CF reader on the cheap, and configure the Westell as a bridge, and move the NATting and routing to your new device.

    You still get the functionality you wanted w/out spending the $$ on a PC. Just a thought.
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