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Programming C++ and C#

This fall I'll be starting my second year in, well, I'm not actually sure what the American or English equivelant would be but it really doesn't matter. I'm going to enter my first programming class where I'll learn to do C++ and C#. So I tought it would be nice to have a fast and neat Linux system running on my computer instead of the increadibly slow Windows XP that's by standard running on the campus computers. Firefox sometimes takes minutes to launch xD.

So my first question is how many distributions are there that has the option of doing a one-file install onto a USB-drive? I know that Puppy Linux does this and I'm going to try it out once I get to it but are there any other distributions with the same functionality out there?

My second question is: Are there any good programming suites out on the Linux platform suitable for a newcommer to programming? All I'm really looking for is syntaxchecking, autocompletion and being able to compile and run the code right in the box without having to switch around a lot.

Comments

  • Set_KillerSet_Killer Posts: 31
    Hello

    One of the best LiveUSB distro is Slax. This distro have vary nice package manager. its cool. The bad thing here is that the latest version does not support Ext4. But hope they will fix it soon.

    For C++ the best option for IDE is Code::Blocks. Geany is also vary good, fast and has support for other programming languages. all you need to do is to setup the compile command. Gedit also supports synataxes for some langs but it is not suitable for beginners.

    The best IDE for C# is Monodevelop. I am not sure but i think it does not supports Windows Forms, but it supports Gtk#. I have just started with Mono and C# at all so can't help you much with this. The latest version of Monodevelop is 2.0 but but i dislike some functions like running (console) project in the box - you can't input from keyboard. Running it from the terminal is OK. however i hope the newer version will come soon with great functionallity.

    My suggestion is to do not wait for the fall to come to start learning c++/c#. Do it now. So when the others do hello world programs you will do queries from mysql or whatever you are interested in.

    gl & hf
  • FBulovicFBulovic Posts: 5
    Probably best C++ IDE on Linux would be Eclipse or NetBeans. But that would be programming C++ and Java.
  • OjMOjM Posts: 8
    My second question is: Are there any good programming suites out on the Linux platform suitable for a newcommer to programming? All I'm really looking for is syntaxchecking, autocompletion and being able to compile and run the code right in the box without having to switch around a lot.

    Hi, I'm also learning to program C, and I'd recommend Vim for those needs. It's a text-editor. A really productive one. Though it has a funny learning curve, because it's something you have never used before.

    http://www.viemu.com/a-why-vi-vim.html
  • RovanionRovanion Posts: 73
    Yeah I'm very sure that Vi is a very powerful text editor once you learn how to use it. I will at some point learn how to use it I guess.
    But does Vim come with syntax markup for c++?

    Anyways. I've started reading the first Wikibook about programming C++ and I've gotten codeblocks on my laptop running SliTaz and my main desktop running Mint.
    I did try out Slax on my USB drive and it worked excellent and I was o so suprised at how much I liked KDE 3.5. But there is one problem that breaks my euphoria about how good Slax actually worked. And that was that Xorg didn't start if I added too many modules to my Slax build. That's a huge bummer. I don't even have a chance of getting Amarok running with the 5tons of dependencies it has.

    So that kind of broke it. I do now have Fedora installed on the USB drive. We'll see how that works out.
  • altNullaltNull Posts: 65
    C++/C are the priamary langauges of Linux. C# is a Microsoft gimmick designed at suckering in developers. It only works within the .net framework of Windows, thus anything built in C# cannot be directly compiled Linux or Unix. If your truly a supporter of Open Source, then you'll boycott it like the rest of us.

    As for IDE, I recommend Code::Blocks. Its Open Source, has many of the same support features as Microsofts IDE, and it supports a multitude of Compilers (including the Microsoft one). But for beginners, the best thing is a text editor with color coding for multiple languages. I recommend Notepad++ or gedit. Both are open source and gedit comes on most Linux distros that use Gnome. That, along with GCC is the best for getting your feet wet in programming.
  • Thank you Lelouch, or would you like to be called Zero?, for the recommendations. Anyways it turned out that my class is for C# so I'm going Mono along with Monodevelop.
  • Good luck. Personally, though I did not take a class, I found C# to be to controlling to be considered a programing language. You have to do garbage collection their way. I prefer programming to be the most opening experience possible - even if that means wiping your hard drive or causing a memory leak.
  • Since it's my first programming language I have no issue with the language taking out the garbage and preventing memory leaks by it self. But I guess it is as with Linux. You start out with Ubuntu and Fedora and then as you learn more you may choose to go deeper int Arch or Gentoo.
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