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kernel

if we install a new kernel module in our linux system, will older one remove automatically or it'll be there with new one or the newer one'll upgrade the older???

if installation of new kernel will remove the older then what about that particular very short time when there is no kernel in the system....... i mean time between older one is removed and newer is ready to install.....

i knw this is very clumpsy question, but i tried best to explain u my problem.

Comments

  • Goineasy9Goineasy9 Posts: 1,116
    A new kernel and modules doesn't replace the old one, it is added separately and becomes active when you reboot. Older modules along with their kernels are only removed when you physically remove that older version of the kernel.
    If you add a new kernel and then reboot, you can see both kernels in grub, and you can choose either to boot from.
    I always keep at least one older version on my computer in case the newer kernel fails (which has never happened to me), this way you always have a backup, and are always able to boot up to make repairs.

    Hope this helped
  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    gr8linux wrote:
    if we install a new kernel module in our linux system, will older one remove automatically or it'll be there with new one or the newer one'll upgrade the older???

    if installation of new kernel will remove the older then what about that particular very short time when there is no kernel in the system....... i mean time between older one is removed and newer is ready to install.....

    i knw this is very clumpsy question, but i tried best to explain u my problem.
    Kernels and kernel modules are separate entities. You can remove a module with the modprobe command, and only that service is unavailable until you load the new module. Likewise, you can remove a kernel or add a new one, but it won't affect the running system until you reboot. Remember, Linux is not like Windows. It is designed to be updated in-situ and keep running until you are ready to reboot or restart a service.
  • kschandrakschandra Posts: 1
    edited August 2016

    I have a doubt about Kernel task.

    Kernel is used for resource allocation and memory management. Whether kernel is responsible for user authentication ? If you are thinking about PAM. Is PAM a part of Kernel ?

  • saqman2060saqman2060 Posts: 777

    The login shell is responsible for user authentication. The shell, like bash, is the program that runs ontop of the kernel giving a user the means to access the resources that the kernel controls. The kernel does not care about users and applications that run in user space only applications that it needs to access. 

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