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Should I Try Fedora?

ravi_buzravi_buz Posts: 3

Hai i started using ubuntu from 8.04 and used it as a secondary Os and started to like it and now with 9.04 i have completely removed windows.I wanted to try some other distro and installed opensuse 11 in secondary HDD and i corrupted my ubuntu filesystem moreover i didnt like it too.Now with a new fedora version comming in 9 days showed i try it or stick with ubuntu .:blink: :blink: :blink:

Comments

  • atreyuatreyu Posts: 216
    ravi_buz wrote:
    Hai i started using ubuntu from 8.04 and used it as a secondary Os and started to like it and now with 9.04 i have completely removed windows.I wanted to try some other distro and installed opensuse 11 in secondary HDD and i corrupted my ubuntu filesystem moreover i didnt like it too.Now with a new fedora version comming in 9 days showed i try it or stick with ubuntu .:blink: :blink: :blink:

    Yes, you should definitely at least try it. Of the RPM-based distros, it is one of the most popular, most supported, and has a huge repository of great 3rd party software. That's strange about SUSE corrupting your Ubuntu filesystem. I've never installed those two together, but I have just recently installed Ubuntu+Fedora (+Windows, bleah) and I can tell you I had no problems with either Linux OS.

    When you do install Fedora, don't let the installer auto-create the filesystems for you, or it might try to reclaim the Ubuntu partitions. Do it manually, and you should be okay.

    good luck!
  • nickbananickbana Posts: 5
    Thank for reminding me that Fedora 11 is going to be released very soon. I'd want to try it, too. :)

    I had an ISO for Fedora 10, and it actually looks very nice. I am using KDE, though, so I have not yet really tried Fedora with GNOME.

    Anyway, I find it strange that openSUSE would do that to your Ubuntu installation. The same as the poster before, me I have not tried installing them in one hard drive, but then again, I have not yet tried installing two linuxes in one system.

    openSUSE is also nice, though. It looks clean and green. :)
  • HellowHellow Posts: 1
    Well, it really does depend upon what you need from a distro. Ubuntu and Fedora are alike in many ways, excluding their different package formats.
  • devkhadkadevkhadka Posts: 8
    No software or a single page code too are never 100% bug free, so if you are thinking of to migrate from ubuntu to fedora due to the problems and bugs i think it is not a good idea. Fedora is not error free too . i have tried all the versions from 1to 9 and waiting for fc11.

    It is said that FC11 would be more stable than other prior distros but it wont be fully error free. and mind you get more knowledge about system when u get errors and bugs
  • tw3aktw3ak Posts: 37
    Crunchbang is worth a look if you watch tv,videos or play music on your pc it's got most of the codecs and a light OPENBOX window manager. It's based on Ubuntu/Debian
  • Goineasy9Goineasy9 Posts: 1,116
    I would say try Fedora. A Live CD is great for evaluation. I tried the Fedora 11 pre-release and was impressed. Actually impressed enough to want to install it on one of my boxes as a replacement for Debian Sid. Am waiting for the actual release though, which is due any day.
    I hear that kvm (virtualization) is represented very well on the new release, and I can't wait to give it a try.
  • atreyuatreyu Posts: 216
    Goineasy9 wrote:
    I would say try Fedora. A Live CD is great for evaluation. I tried the Fedora 11 pre-release and was impressed. Actually impressed enough to want to install it on one of my boxes as a replacement for Debian Sid. Am waiting for the actual release though, which is due any day.
    I hear that kvm (virtualization) is represented very well on the new release, and I can't wait to give it a try.

    @Goineasy9,

    That's encouraging to hear about F11 - I'm looking forward to the release!
  • GossamerGossamer Posts: 20
    Fedora was... OK, I didn't get too in-depth with it although I've only ran it though virtualbox. Basically the only difference I saw between it and Ubuntu was the package manager, although; like I said. I didn't spend much time with it...

    I'm talking like... not even two hours before I got bored.
  • Sure. Fedora 11 came out today so it might be worth giving that a test :)
  • mikesdmikesd Posts: 11
    What was your problem w/ openSUSE? I'm not a big RH/Fedora fan. I feel they break things. My personal opinion. I happen to use openSUSE and love it. I've always got more helpful support from the suse guys too than from the red hat guys. I would say, though, if you're used to the apt setup, then stick w/ the Debian based distros. I don't and won't use them, but if you like them more power to you. If you want to start to learn rpm based distros, then give opensuse a try again. Post in the Opensuse forms any problems you have and I'm sure you'll get some help.
  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    Fedora's ok - I used it at work a couple of years ago and it was solid enough, but not particularly exciting. Currently I run CentOS on my honker workstation, and Ubuntu 9.04 on my laptop. Each has its advantages. I was especially impressed when Ubuntu supported my Sprint Sierra wireless broadband USB modem without any configuration on my part. I just plugged it in, and told it to connect - voila! It did the same thing for my internal bluetooth nic when I installed that recently. The CentOS system is my major development box, and I run multiple guest operating systems in VirtualBox. It has been uber-reliable for me.

    So, if you like Ubuntu and are running on a laptop, stay with that. If you want to check out fedora, then run it in a VM until you are convinced that you would prefer that to Ubuntu. They are both state-of-the-art operating systems.
  • kggykggy Posts: 18
    hi,
    in my opinion you should stick with a clean ubuntu installation. i have tried SuSe, debian and other distros as well but i always returned to ubuntu.it is the easiest way to get your job done. fedora gives me "the Windows" impression as far as GUI goes, and if you decided to ditch Windows than ubuntu should be your choice. you can still try other distros on a virtual machine, this way you don't mess up your system!!!
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