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How to install Linux

I have Mint v.10 that I want to install. I have read gizmo's instructions about backing up data, making a clone of my hard drive, doing the basic cleanup and optimizing of the hard drive. However, I have an HP Laptop with 1GB ram, 87GB physical memory with a c: drive and a d: drive for hp backup. I really would like to use only Linux as an operating system, but am leary about formatting my laptop and getting rid of the original drive structure. Sorry if this sounds confusing, but then I am confused;). Any help would be appreciated.

Forgot to tell you I have windows vista on this machine Drive c: has 140 gb, with 77.8 used. D: 8 gb with 6.49 used, intel core2 duo cpu, T5250 @150 Mhz, 2 cores 2 logical processors. Question: can I partition using this computer?

Comments

  • asedtasedt Posts: 96
    Hi

    First there is a nice pdf here whit pictures of the install process of Linux Mint 10:
    http://www.linuxmint.com/documentation.php

    Page 14 is the interesting page, you see you got 3 options.

    1. install it alongside other operating system
    2. use the entire disk
    3. specify partitions manually


    The 2:en option is the easy option if you want to remove everything from the hd and only install Linux mint on it. However you may consider option 3 because option 2 only make one root and swap partition and you may want to separate it more or keep any of the old partions.

    You can read about it here: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2010/11/14/linux-mint-10-manual-disk-partitioning-guide/

    Maybe I answered something? else just ask more :D
  • my english is very bad, but is posible this video halp you.

  • saqman2060saqman2060 Posts: 777
    In order to install mint, your hard drives needs to use a partition with a linux file system. The good thing about linux is, you don't need a lot of harddrive space to install it. I'm not quite sure, I think you only need 2.4GB or hard drive space.

    If you have a current operating system on your drive, you can use Mint's partition manager to resize the partition and create one of any size. This will allow you to keep the drive structure that your current files or operating is installed on. You then have the option of accessing your files within Mint as you would on your previous system.

    If you want, we can write a blog with detailed instructions on how to install Mint and re-partition your harddrive.
  • asedtasedt Posts: 96
    saqman2060 wrote:
    The good thing about linux is, you don't need a lot of harddrive space to install it. I'm not quite sure, I think you only need 2.4GB or hard drive space.

    Linux Mint System requirements (4GB hd) is listed here: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=1581

    If you talking Linux in general there is lightweight system only needing a few MB and lower.
  • saqman2060saqman2060 Posts: 777
    asedt wrote:
    saqman2060 wrote:
    The good thing about linux is, you don't need a lot of harddrive space to install it. I'm not quite sure, I think you only need 2.4GB or hard drive space.

    Linux Mint System requirements (4GB hd) is listed here: http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=1581

    If you talking Linux in general there is lightweight system only needing a few MB and lower.

    Thanks for correcting me.
  • atreyuatreyu Posts: 216
    Another option...do you have a spare laptop (2.5") hard drive kicking around that you can use? Maybe swipe one from an old laptop? Then you can remove your original drive and stick it on the shelf, then install the borrowed drive into the laptop (easier than it sounds...). You just have to make sure that the drive has the proper interface (SATA/PATA/44-pin, etc.) - just compare it to the original drive (or look up the model number in Windows then google it to find the interface type). Now install Linux on the laptop and go nuts w/partitioning. Once Linux is installed, you can access the data on the Windows laptop drive via a USB disk enclosure.

    -bill
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