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NEW to LINUX

I am a home recording enthusiest using W-XP :( .

It is very restricting and uses a ton of my much needed resources.

For some yrs now I have heard many PC users who are reluctant to make the jump to a MAC will use LINUX or other OPEN SOURCE OS. It has caught my attention now as I am about to build a PC for recording only.

With so much new tech out there and new equipment, will i be able to create the drivers needed to operate properly for various hardware and software?

Will i be spending more time on LINUX developement or is it pretty easy to grasp the concept. I do not want to be spending needless time on building the tools Ill need to operate my main functions. I realize that there will always be up-keep and development needs, at the same time a smooth running system is the end goal.

Does Linux support MULTI CORE proccessing? RAM capacities above 4GB would be nice to. What can I expect using LINUX when it comes to processing?

I know my way around a PC rather well. However Code is something of a mystyrey to me still.

Maybe someone out there has a recording setup and can help me out.

Thanks so much.

D

Comments

  • JinuxJinux Posts: 20
    Multi-core? Of course ;)

    Just check out http://linuxmint.com/
  • Goineasy9Goineasy9 Posts: 1,116
    Linux Mint is a good choice for those new to Linux, it comes with all the extras (codecs etc.) one needs for audio and video. If your looking at a recording setup, take a look at Audacity. There might be other recording apps, but that's a good place to start.

    BTW - Linux does mutli-core processing, it will handle memory 4GB and above, 64 bit versions with no problem, 32 bit versions using a PAE kernel.
  • hi im a newbie .....................
  • masokismasokis Posts: 4
    Nice thread.. i am newbies to.. but i glad to use linux.
    here..i can learn lot of thing. I can build my own distro... what a great.
    when i watching hacker (1995) movie.. i was in love with linux. :)
  • Great that you found a home with linux, welcome aboard.
  • I'm relatively new to Linux; I've been using it for a few months now and I really like it.
  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    Deathmetald wrote:
    I am a home recording enthusiest using W-XP :( .

    It is very restricting and uses a ton of my much needed resources.

    For some yrs now I have heard many PC users who are reluctant to make the jump to a MAC will use LINUX or other OPEN SOURCE OS. It has caught my attention now as I am about to build a PC for recording only.

    With so much new tech out there and new equipment, will i be able to create the drivers needed to operate properly for various hardware and software?

    Will i be spending more time on LINUX developement or is it pretty easy to grasp the concept. I do not want to be spending needless time on building the tools Ill need to operate my main functions. I realize that there will always be up-keep and development needs, at the same time a smooth running system is the end goal.

    Does Linux support MULTI CORE proccessing? RAM capacities above 4GB would be nice to. What can I expect using LINUX when it comes to processing?

    I know my way around a PC rather well. However Code is something of a mystyrey to me still.

    Maybe someone out there has a recording setup and can help me out.

    Thanks so much.

    D

    1. There are a number of current Linux distributions that are tailored for home recording and sound processing. For a newbie and ease of use + compatibility with a lot of hardware you might want to check out Ubuntu Studio: http://ubuntustudio.org/

    2. All current linux systems support multi-processor and multi-core hardware. I am writing this on a 64-bit dual-CPU, 8-core, 8GB dual HD monitor workstation running CentOS 5.5. I have an NPR jazz station streaming audio, a DVD playing (paused right now), am downloading some Doctor Who videos, am building the latest GNU compiler suite, and have Windows XP and Solaris x86 virtual machines running all at the same time without affecting system usability.

    You may need to learn how to build software packages from source code, but most will be available to you as pre-built binary packages using the standard system package manager. Remember, most (not all) software available for Linux is open source and while many will be available to download and install without problems, some will require that you download the source code and configure/build them on your system so that they will use the libraries and tools available on your system.

    Anyway, good luck, and enjoy your new system experience! :-)
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