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Kernel Update

ActiveXActiveX Posts: 59

Hi.

I use Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. I always update the OS as frequent as possible. Today, I've accepted kernel update, which happened last time about a month ago. Everything is OK, but I have 6 Ubuntu boot options in GRUB, 2 for each kernel (Standard and recovery mode).

Does it mean that all these 3 kernels are installed on my system?

If it's so, do I need to remove previous ones, since this last one is working correctly?

And if I should do so, how should I do that?

Thanks so much.

Comments

  • Goineasy9Goineasy9 Posts: 1,116
    Does it mean that all these 3 kernels are installed on my system?
    Yes
    If it's so, do I need to remove previous ones, since this last one is working correctly?
    No, one always leaves at least 2 kernels in case a problem arises in the most recent one. I use Fedora and the default is to keep 3 kernels.

    When I was using Debian, I had to remove extra kernels manually. I would think that Ubuntu would have a default like Fedora (max 3 kernels), but to make sure maybe someone who is a current Ubuntu user can verify that.
  • ActiveXActiveX Posts: 59
    well, the new question for me is that don't these kernel interfere each other's activities?

    I mean how come directory structure in the drive I've installed Linux in remains the same, programs are being launched from where they were, but there are 3 kernels installed?

    Give me up if you think my questions are extremely stupid. I'm new to linux and I wanna know the truth, as much as possible.

    Thanks :)
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    ActiveX wrote:
    well, the new question for me is that don't these kernel interfere each other's activities?

    I mean how come directory structure in the drive I've installed Linux in remains the same, programs are being launched from where they were, but there are 3 kernels installed?

    Give me up if you think my questions are extremely stupid. I'm new to linux and I wanna know the truth, as much as possible.

    Thanks :)

    The kernels will not interfere with each others' activities since they are in separate directories and only one is launched when the system is booted.

    Remember that the kernel is loaded during boot time by the bootloader, the kernel only really effects how your system interacts with the hardware. The software itself should not be overly effected by the kernel except for speed (based upon the cpu driver used) and potential hardware dependent software.

    If you choose you can remove the old kernels from your system by reviewing the synaptic package manager, searching for kernel and manually removing them. But if you do that you will still have to clean up your grub bootloader file. My preference is to save the kernels in place, but comment out the old kernels from the bootloader so they are not longer visible.
  • marcmarc Posts: 647
    ActiveX wrote:
    well, the new question for me is that don't these kernel interfere each other's activities?

    I mean how come directory structure in the drive I've installed Linux in remains the same, programs are being launched from where they were, but there are 3 kernels installed?

    Give me up if you think my questions are extremely stupid. I'm new to linux and I wanna know the truth, as much as possible.

    Thanks :)

    There is no problem at all for having many kernels installed. The thing is that only one kernel is running at a time and they don't interfear at all with each other. As long as you do not need to make room on your hard drive, I would leave the kernels in there as a safe option if anytime there is a problem with your default kernel so you could boot up your machine and try to solve the problem :)

    Best regards
  • jabiralijabirali Posts: 157
    In Ubuntu 10.04, you can also use System -> Administration -> Computer Janitor to remove old kernels. The grub2 (bootloader) configuration file will be automatically updated when you install/remove kernels.
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