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Heat

Hi, all!

I have Ubuntu installed on my laptop alongside Windows Vista. I notice that when I'm using Linux, my computer seems to run somewhat hotter. The base (where my wrists rest when typing) seems to get warm, the fan kicks in faster and seems to work harder, and the air blowing out of the vent seems warmer.

I went out and bought a cooling mat for my laptop, and that seems to be working well. The base still gets warm, but no hot air is blowing out of the vent.

Should everything be alright with the cooling mat? Or should I be concerned about a hardware problem that Linux is causing? Has anyone else experienced this problem?

Comments

  • woboylewoboyle Posts: 501
    This is not an uncommon complaint. Check your power management settings. You can probably tweak them somewhat to reduce the heat produced by the CPU and other circuitry. You can configure the system to reduce cpu speed when it isn't being used, among other things, depending upon the distribution+version of Linux that you are running. Which is what, by the way?
  • I'm using the Ubuntu 10.04 distribution. How can I configure the power management settings and reduce heat? Sorry if this sounds retarded-- I'm new to Linux.
  • marcmarc Posts: 647
    MATThematical wrote:
    I'm using the Ubuntu 10.04 distribution. How can I configure the power management settings and reduce heat? Sorry if this sounds retarded-- I'm new to Linux.

    I don't know exactly as I do not use gnome, it shouldn't be difficult to find through the menus though.
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    I also do not use ubuntu or gnome, but I can offer some guidance.

    It appears that the base ubuntu installation does not have all of the necessary power and fan control libraries loaded for your particular system, depending on the heat generated and type of hardware you have this can cause issues if it is not quickly addressed.

    First add the cpu frequency monitor applet to your main bar by right-clicking on the bar, go to add applet and select the name of the program I stated.
    Once it is installed change the setting to conservative to lower your cpu usage, which will reduce heat and battery usage.

    Then you can check the instruction on http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1481580 to setup the fan control base which should help to auto-manage your cooling fans.

    One of the apps that the guide tells you to install is lm-sensors, once that is installed you can enter the terminal and type sensors to see what the temperatures are in your system. I would like to know what temps are being read before and after those changes to see the potential of damage and see proof if my steps helped.
  • Goineasy9Goineasy9 Posts: 1,116
    System-->Preferences-->Screensaver-->Power Management

    or

    Right click on the power icon (plug & battery) on panel in upper right of desktop and choose preferences.

    That is, if the Gnome setup in Ubuntu is similar to that of Fedora. It can't be far off.
  • mfillpot wrote:

    First add the cpu frequency monitor applet to your main bar by right-clicking on the bar, go to add applet and select the name of the program I stated.
    Once it is installed change the setting to conservative to lower your cpu usage, which will reduce heat and battery usage.

    Then you can check the instruction on http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1481580 to setup the fan control base which should help to auto-manage your cooling fans.

    I installed that CPU frequency monitor applet and it offers options including a bunch of frequencies, Ondemand, Conservative, Performance, and Powersave. My current setting is Ondemand. Should I choose an option like Conservative or Powersave?

    Also, I looked at the instruction at the link you gave me. The things that are just typed there that are not part of a sentence...are those commands?
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    MATThematical wrote:
    mfillpot wrote:

    First add the cpu frequency monitor applet to your main bar by right-clicking on the bar, go to add applet and select the name of the program I stated.
    Once it is installed change the setting to conservative to lower your cpu usage, which will reduce heat and battery usage.

    Then you can check the instruction on http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1481580 to setup the fan control base which should help to auto-manage your cooling fans.

    I installed that CPU frequency monitor applet and it offers options including a bunch of frequencies, Ondemand, Conservative, Performance, and Powersave. My current setting is Ondemand. Should I choose an option like Conservative or Powersave?

    Also, I looked at the instruction at the link you gave me. The things that are just typed there that are not part of a sentence...are those commands?

    Conservative mode is best because it slowly steps between frequencies to minimize power use and heat generated.

    The parts that are not in sentences are commands to install utilities to control your fan and cooling.
  • marcmarc Posts: 647
    mfillpot wrote:
    Conservative mode is best because it slowly steps between frequencies to minimize power use and heat generated.

    The parts that are not in sentences are commands to install utilities to control your fan and cooling.[/quote]

    I disagree. I've been tracking the power consumption for a while on many intel based computers and the best way to go is "ondemand".

    It seems is better to be just a little moment at highest speed rather than a while at a lower speed. Keep in mind than here not only applies the speed of the CPU but the *state* at which is working.

    Being at C4 state for 55 seconds and 5 at C0 is better than being 25 at C2 and 35 at C4. (just numbers thrown out of my head but I hope you get the idea)

    (by the way: the lower the state the higher power it consumes being C0 the worst)

    Don't know about other architectures but probably is pretty similar ;)

    Regards
  • mfillpotmfillpot Posts: 2,180
    In my tests conservative avoided many sudden spikes and extended the battery life on a the test machines slightly better than ondemand, but on demand does offer better response time. In the end the user(s) can try both and use what works best for them.

    As a note most distros recommend ondemand, so the default is usually a good place to start.
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