Welcome to the Linux Foundation Forum!

Upgrade Just By Changing Repositories?

Okay, I know this sounds like a newbie question, but here's why I'm asking:

Xubuntu 9.10 is awesome, fast, and perfect on my 'puter. The latest version is very slow, troublesome, and very resource hungry.

When 9.10 reaches "end of life," why can't I just edit my software sources list to "Lucid" instead of "Karmic," rather than upgrade and have my poor 'puter slowed down by all that buggy Plymouth and PulseAudio stuff they put in 10.04?

I would seriously rather run 9.10 unsupported (and fast) than a supported version that makes my poor old hand-me-down 'puter slow to a crawl.

Thanks,

Robin

Comments

  • woboyle
    woboyle Posts: 501
    Actually, in the update manager, there should be a big, prominent button to "upgrade" the system to the latest (lucid lynx - 10.04). That should take care of everything for you, presumably.
  • I know about that upgrade button... what I'm concerned about is that the upgrade will install whatever that stuff is (I think it's Plymouth) that slows everything down and kills the sound (PulseAudio?).

    That's why I was thinking of just editing my /sources list to the Lucid repos instead of the karmic ones, leaving my Karmic installation intact instead of polluting my 'puter with all that Lucid stuff that makes it crawl worse than Windows did.

    Shouldn't they be compatible? Can I simply changes the repos (for newer versions of applications) without upgrading?

    Thanks,
    R
  • gomer
    gomer Posts: 158
    Not necessarily. Some of the packages in the Lucid repository may have dependancies on libraries and other packages that are not normally part of kermic. Once you start to cross polinate like that, you may find youself with a badly broken installation.

    Of course, you can always just try it in a VM and see how badly it breaks, if at all. But beware that even if the "upgrade" works, picking packages that were not previously picked may lead you into the aformentioned quagmire.
  • mfillpot
    mfillpot Posts: 2,180
    This is something that I have not yet ventured to do in ubuntu, but I know for a fact that is is possible with other distros such as what I did with slackware. In my case I changed my sources, installed the "new" base packages, run an upgrade function to upgrade or downgrade all installed packages to their latest version on the source mirror then ran a cleanup function to remove all unsupported packages. This worked perfectly for me to bring my system to a stable reverted state. Hopefully there is a similar set or commands that you can issue in ubuntu to revert your system to a past release, maybe 9.04.
  • I'd like to try, if I can, because the later versions are much more troublesomme on my aging hardware than the older ones. 9.04 was a beauty, and 9.10 was great as well. But from 10.4, with the inclusion of that very buggy Plymouth and PulseAudio stuff that was never in Xubuntu before, it's slower than Windows XP was and has boot-up and sound issues I can't overcome.

    I reckon that by the time Karmic reaches end-of-life, Debian might be truly ready for the desktop by then... or perhaps Linux Mint's Debian Edition will be mature enough for a non-geeky kid like me.

    I wish the Xubuntu developers had not chosen a LTS version to put all this weird buggy stuff in.

    [rant]
    And - just a short rant here - I wonder if they've shot themselves in the foot in a way. Because one of the main reasons people look for an alternate OS is that their aging hardware is too underpowered to run the later versions of Windows and they can't afford to upgrade their machines. Imagine their frustration when they find that the latest version of "the best newbie-friendly Linux distro" is as resource-hungry as Windows! Sure, there are a zillion "lightweight" alternatives, but Ubuntu (and it's derivatives) is the one that Google and most "distro chooser" sites direct newbies to.
    [/rant]

    That's why I was kinda hoping to just change repos and hope that Plymouth and PulseAudio are not dependencies for security updates, which are the only updates I will accept anyway.

    -Robin
  • mfillpot
    mfillpot Posts: 2,180
    I attempted to downgrade my 10.04 ubuntu installation to 9.04 by changing the repos and running the aptitude commands. Unfortunately it when it looks at packages it looks only at the version number and does not care if your version is newer than the latest one in the repo, so the attempt failed because it would not attempt to download and install the packages from the older version. Also when I searched the internet I found many posts stating that it is not designed to roll-back and the best option would be to do a fresh install.

    I am sorry for the bad news, but it look like the assumptions built into ubuntu are really restricting you in this case.
  • I reckon I should have known... a fresh install really is the only way to "downgrade," and as long as it is still supported, all is well. 9.10 is well supported for a whole 'nother 7 months. And a lot can happen in that time - including having plenty of chances to test lighter distros for older hardware. I'd go with Puppy later, but being logged in as root all the time is too scary. :laugh:

    I'm sure my next distro won't be Ubuntu or Ubuntu-based, though, unless they either rid it of Plymouth and PulseAudio or fix it so it doesn't slow everything down so much and cripple the sound.

    One nice li'l fringe benefit of going back to Karmic was that I got my good ol' Thunderbird 2.0 with the Lightning extension back. :lol:

    All is well - until April of next year at least.

    -R
  • mfillpot
    mfillpot Posts: 2,180
    Your little test is what has finally pushed ubuntu off of my laptop, all things have begun lagging lately and the lack of capacity for a clean downgrade has pushed it too far.

    So, with that being the case I have installed arch into my test partition to replace ubuntu.

    If you are looking to explore I would like to recommend slackware, you would appreciate the manual nature of it.
  • I've come to suspect that the problems I had with Lucid are an Intel issue. The old kernel and drivers were fine, but the new ones in Lucid are atrocious on Intel video cards. It may be something they'll be able to fix in some update, or maybe Meerkat will have better Intel video drivers, I dunno.

    On one hand I could rant about Ubuntu being too heavy for older hardware, but on the other hand it's prob'ly not really fair to expect a major desktop distro to cater to a dwindling market of hand-me-down 'puter users like me.

    I've read alot of really good things about Salix (Slackware-based, fully compatible) for older hardware. When I'm ready I'll check their hardware compatibility list and give that one a try, or maybe give CentOS a shot, or try Linux Mint's Debian edition. I still have plenty of Linux distros to choose from, and I guess I shouldn't be "angry" at Canonical for the Intel/Plymouth issue... but I do have to say it's very disappointing, and particularly so because 10.4, being a LTS release, was to be my 3-year solution - and it didn't last a week.

    -Robin
  • mfillpot wrote:
    Your little test is what has finally pushed ubuntu off of my laptop, all things have begun lagging lately and the lack of capacity for a clean downgrade has pushed it too far.

    So, with that being the case I have installed arch into my test partition to replace ubuntu.

    If you are looking to explore I would like to recommend slackware, you would appreciate the manual nature of it.

    Arch Linux install - Thumbs up.

Categories

Upcoming Training