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Desktop Environments

What do you find to be the most productive desktop environment?

My personal favourite is XMonad. The easy-to-use keyboard interface allows for a quick and responsive way to deal with programs, rivalling the power of the command-line, yet including the options of the GUI. Furthermore, the simple and straight-forward design runs and works faster than either GNOME or KDE, and the tiling system allows for an efficient task-handling device. In addition, it is written in Haskell, and is more stable than most other desktop managers.

Therefore, I believe that XMonad provides the more efficient and productive environment.

Comments

  • Oh, I just realized that I wasn't logged on ...
  • I'm a pretty big fan of XFCE when it comes to a full desktop environment. It does everything most users want, is very low on resource usage, and is fairly easily customized (working with compiz and devilspie can lead to a desktop that is beautifully custom).

    Outside of XFCE I really love the pekwm window manager. It allows window grouping, and is very flexible and customizable. I've also been playing around with the awesome window manager -- a tiling manger similar to monad or ion.

    IMO - tiling window managers are nice, I've just never really had the time to sit down and tweak them to the level that I'd like to. Without doing that, I haven't reached the productivity level that I have with XFCE and/or pekwm.

    George
  • My main preference is GNOME. I had used KDE in the past, but I just had this fondness for GNOME. I mostly like GTK applications anyway, so it fits me very well.

    I have played with a few window managers. I have also played with Xfce (but not LXDE, yet B)). I really like GNOME apps and most other apps I use like Firefox, fit with GNOME better.

    I am worried about GNOME 3.0 and the GNOME Shell, though. I haven't looked into it much yet. The sad thing for me is that many developers prefer to lose many options they had and stick to sane defaults, which is nice. But, some of those options that I need to use my computer efficiently become difficult to get to.

    I may end up switching to either Xfce or KDE in a couple of years, who knows? I can be quite the thrill-seeker. B)
  • tinnytinny Posts: 5
    I like GNOME myself, not because its the fastest desktop environment but because its solid and never lets me down. I have noticed that when software just works it helps me suppress my incessant need to tinker and so im ultimately more productive because of this.
  • atreyuatreyu Posts: 216
    Desktop Environments wrote:
    What do you find to be the most productive desktop environment?

    My personal favourite is XMonad. The easy-to-use keyboard interface allows for a quick and responsive way to deal with programs, rivalling the power of the command-line, yet including the options of the GUI. Furthermore, the simple and straight-forward design runs and works faster than either GNOME or KDE, and the tiling system allows for an efficient task-handling device. In addition, it is written in Haskell, and is more stable than most other desktop managers.

    Therefore, I believe that XMonad provides the more efficient and productive environment.

    Between the big two, I opt for GNOME. I mainly use Fedora/RHEL/CentOS, so this makes sense. If I'm over the network , I use Fluxbox (Blackbox, in a pinch). If I'm on a dog-slow box, I use Fluxbox with SLIM. If I want to impress somebody who's never seen/used Linux, I use Enlightenment.
  • masinickmasinick Posts: 20
    I use a wide variety of desktop and window managers, though I have never used XMonad, nor have I, to my knowledge, used any tools or applications written in Haskell, though I have at least heard of it.

    I've been using UNIX systems since before the X Window System was even available (1982), and I used some of the very early Xlib implementations of X, the Motif implementation when it first came out, and fvwm when I first started using Linux based systems. Therefore, window and desktop managers that have some common traits with these environments tend to be the ones that I am the most familiar with.

    I use KDE and XFCE about 50/50, and the two of them probably comprise nearly 90% of my desktop use. The remaining 10% I split between a variety of desktop and window managers. When I use a window manager, I probably use IceWM the most, followed by fvwm-crystal.

    I use most of the major desktop and window managers at least a little bit, if for no other reason than to try them out. GNOME is way better than it used to be; years ago I did not care much for it; these days I use other environments mostly because of time spent and familiarity with them.
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